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Peer Mentor Profiles

Peer Mentor Profiles

Meet some of our Peer Mentors and learn more about their experience of the Peer Mentoring scheme.

Meet some of our Peer Mentors and learn more about the Peer Mentoring scheme. Find out why they decided to become a Peer Mentor, what the role actually involves and what transferable skills they developed.

Farzeen - Media Communication and Cultural Studies

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Josh - Combined Honours

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It is an amazing experience to give back to people who are in the same boat that you were in not so long ago.

Why did you decide to become a Peer Mentor? 

I wanted to help the first year students navigate what can be a challenging and exciting new adjustment. As a student who commutes to university, and has a different experience to many who have gone to university, I felt like my student experience and advice would be helpful to new students in a similar situation. 

What do you do as a Peer Mentor? 

As a Peer Mentor, I am one of the first lines of support for first year students during their first semester. One of my main tasks is to answer any queries my mentees may have and to provide advice to the best of my ability and within reason, in matters ranging from accommodation to academic study. 

What can a mentee expect from a peer mentor? 

A mentee can expect a friendly face and someone who has been in their place, who they can seek advice from and can point them in the right direction. 

What transferable skills have you developed as a result of being a peer mentor? 

I gained and developed my interpersonal skills with others and improved my leadership skills.  By arranging both formal and informal meetings, I also developed organisational skills and learned how to chair meetings, which was of great benefit to me. 

What would you say to someone thinking about becoming a peer mentor? 

Do it! It is an amazing experience to give back to people who are in the same boat that you were in not so long ago. Do not let the thought of responsibility prevent you from helping your fellow students and the university community as a whole. Your job is mostly as a guide to the best resources and support available to your mentees, not being responsible for them or their first semester as students. 

What was it like being nominated for peer mentor of the year? 

It was an absolute joy to find out I was nominated by my mentees and probably the biggest thank you I could get for the work and time I put in helping them. I was enormously grateful.  

Catherine - English Literature

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Spencer - Biology

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I wanted to share my knowledge with new students so that their experience was as enjoyable as possible. 

Why did you decide to become a Peer Mentor? 

From my personal experience as a first year student, I know that transitioning to university life can be a daunting experience for many reasons. At first, it’s exciting. Often, you’re moving away from home, family and friends to a new city to study something you’re (hopefully) very passionate about. However, on arrival it can suddenly become very daunting. All those exciting things can be very scary when they actually come to pass and although many find comfort in their new friends as they’re in the same boat as you, a Peer Mentor is an experienced student and a great source of impartial, friendly information on things you often don’t even realise you needed to know about. I wanted to share my knowledge with new students so that their experience was as enjoyable as possible.   

What do you do as a peer mentor? 

I help in a variety of ways, depending on what is best for my mentees. It’s important to be flexible! Often, I will organise regular meetings which benefit my mentees by being structured. Sometimes, it’s good to have unstructured meetings where everyone can sound out their concerns. Either way, it’s always necessary to have an open mind, have open channels of communication and know where and how to refer mentees to further support. 

What can a mentee expect from a peer mentor? 

Mentees can expect impartial, non-judgemental support and signposting to the best and most appropriate university resource, be that a tutor, module leader or student services. 

What transferable skills have you developed as a result of being a peer mentor? 

Relationship management, organisational skills, time management, public speaking and planning and leading meetings and groups. 

What would you say to someone thinking about becoming a peer mentor? 

Remember that when mentoring you truly reap what you sow. The more effort you put in, the better relationships you will build with your mentees and the more meaningful an experience it can become.   

Lauren - Biomedical Sciences

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