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Behavioural Science and Psychology

Behavioural Science and Psychology

Our theme brings together researchers who work on the sciences of mind and behaviour. Our strength is our breadth: from insect behaviour to behaviour change in complex organizations.

Our human research spans fundamental research on psychological processes through to applied psychology. Applied psychology areas of interest include:

  • clinical psychology
  • forensic psychology
  • sports science
  • behaviour change
  • nutrition

We have strong links to the NIHR funded Behavioural Sciences Policy Research Unit.  Its aim is to prevent ill-health and improve health systems. Using behavioural science evidence to inform government policy.

Our non-human work covers a range of insect, mammal and bird species. Through the Comparative Biology Centre we have a range of facilities to do this. Including a breeding colony of European starlings, and an outstation to study jackdaw behaviour.

We are keen to train the next generation of researchers. We host one-year MRes degrees in Evolution and Human Behaviour and Animal Behaviour. We support a community of PhD students. We are part of prestigious doctoral training programmes: the ESRC-funded NINEDTP and the BBSRC-funded NLD doctoral training partnership. Get in touch to discuss future PhD study or a research collaboration.

Research Impact

Our research makes a difference in real-world settings. The diversity of these settings speaks to the breadth of our research expertise. Some of these projects include:

  • the development of anti-theft and anti-dog fouling campaigns
  • the design of the National Audit of Dementia
  • improving motion regulation in footballers
  • designing better tools for probing witness memories for faces
  • the coach development plans of an elite swimming national governing body
  • CPD workshops on managing distress related to the uncertainties associated with the Coronavirus Pandemic for over 1500 NHS practitioners
  • applying our research on cooperation to the development of social policy
  • training police forces on investigative interviewing
  • improving the handling of laboratory rodents

Take Part in Research

Would you like to volunteer to take part in research? We have a database of 1500 people who volunteer their time to take part in our experiments. You will normally need to visit our labs for a few hours. Common tasks include vision or hearing tests, memory or motor tasks. You may complete a task on a computer or even have a brain scan.

All studies are safe and adhere to strict ethical guidelines. Participation is completely voluntary. You can choose which experiments you take part in. To join our list you should be generally healthy with no underlying medical conditions.

To receive emails about studies please sign up using our online form.

If you would like more details or are a researcher interested in using our database please get in touch.

Person sitting at a computer taking part in an experiment