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Research Theme: Machines

Research Theme: Machines

We lead the way in research in electrical machine design.

We have a long history of pioneering academic and industrially driven research.

We work on the full spectrum of machine topologies. These include permanent magnet, reluctance, transverse flux, linear, high speed and axial machines. We have a track record in demonstrating power dense, fault tolerant machines built and tested in house.

We have worked with many industrial partners to drive down the manufacturing cost of motors produced on an industrial scale. We do this by improving efficiency and reducing material mass. We also devise winding techniques that are production line friendly.

Wind turbines in a field.

We have worked with large electrical generators. Our research ranges from conventional coal fired power stations to development of machines for wind turbines and marine renewable energy.

We are involved across the automotive, product and aerospace sectors.

EPSRC Future Electrical Machines Manufacturing Hub

The Electrical Power group is a partner in the EPSRC Future Electrical Machines Manufacturing Hub which combines expertise in electrical machines and manufacturing for the first time.  This £28m investment will enable researchers at the new EPSRC Future Electrical Machines Manufacturing Hub to work with industry on addressing key manufacturing challenges.

Together with key industrial partners including Höganäs AB, Dyson, Rolls Royce and McLaren, the hub will lead on the design of new electrical machines with improved performance for the aerospace, energy, automotive and premium consumer sectors.

Through delivering world-class manufacturing research and innovation, the Hub will assist UK manufacturing to capture significant value in the electrical machine supply chain, improve UK industrial productivity and deliver the environmental benefits and cleaner growth at the heart of the UK’s industrial strategy.

At Newcastle we are focussing on the manufacturing of modular machines and their thermal management which has the potential to significantly increase power densities to meet the future targets of aerospace and automotive applications.

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