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Module

BGM3065 : Biochemistry of Cancer and Chronic Diseases

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Professor Craig Robson
  • Lecturer: Professor Julie Irving, Dr Julian Rutherford, Dr Jill Hunter, Professor Neil Perkins, Dr Caroline Wilson, Dr Ian Cowell, Professor Steven Clifford
  • Owning School: Biomedical, Nutritional and Sports Scien
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

Through lectures and seminars this module aims to;

• provide an understanding of the biochemistry and clinical aspects of a number of chronic human diseases
• explain how knowledge of the biochemistry of a disorder can be used to develop rational drug design for its treatment
• provide an opportunity for students to further develop their written skills and critical analytical skills.
• inform students about the genetic and molecular basis of cancer and its treatment.
• introduce current technologies used in cancer detection, diagnostics and molecular pathology and allow students to explore how these techniques are being applied to advance our understanding of cancer.
• facilitate an understanding of the problems associated with cancer treatments.

Outline Of Syllabus

The biochemistry and clinical aspects of a number of chronic human diseases will be explored to explain how knowledge of the biochemistry of a disorder can be used to develop rational drug design for treatment. Topics include:
• biochemistry of trace metal sensing and its relevance to disease
• core mechanisms of metal-homeostasis (metallochaperones, metal-sensing transcriptional and translational regulators, metal-specific transporters and storage proteins) and provide some examples of the ways in which these processes fail in disease.
• NF-kB signalling in health and disease
• G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling and disease
• background to the biochemistry and molecular biology of cancer
• cancer as a multi-process genetic disease
• role of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes
• roles of failures in the DNA repair mechanisms in causing cancer
• factors that lead to metastasis
• experimental genetic models of tumour development
• methods of anticancer treatment and the problems of drug resistance

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Timetable