Skip to main content

Module

HIS2031 : Between Revolutions: Britain 1688-1789

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr David Hope
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module explores how the culture, society, politics, and economy of Britain was transformed in the period between the ‘Glorious’ Revolution of 1688 and the French Revolution of 1789. The eighteenth century is crucial to understanding how Britain became a modern nation. In just over a century, the population of England and Wales doubled, towns rapidly urbanised, the seeds of the industrial revolution were sown, a new ‘middling sort’ emerged on the back of increasing commercialisation, and Britain acquired a worldwide empire.

The module offers students the chance to engage with a wide range of primary sources, from print culture and material objects to court records and account books. Through a combination of lectures and small-group seminars that include practical, skills-based workshops, the module explores the rise of modern party politics, population growth, Jacobitism, the experiences of women, the expansion of empire, crime and the poor, print culture, industrialisation, and new consumer goods.

The module enables students to acquire a detailed knowledge of the political, social, cultural, and economic changes that made Britain an increasingly ‘modern’ nation over the course of the eighteenth century. Further aims include:

- Practise written communication skills through online collaboration and summative assessment.
- Practise oral communication skills in online seminars through small group tasks.
- Practise a range of study skills via in-depth engagement with a variety of primary sources and interdisciplinary methodologies.
- Develop the capacity for independent study.

Outline Of Syllabus

Outline syllabus, intended as a guide only; week-by-week topics may be slightly different to the following:

1.       From Stuarts to Hanoverians: Tories, Whigs, and Revolutionary Successions
2.       The Union of 1707 and Jacobite Risings
3.       Urbanisation and Population Growth
4.       Print and the Public Sphere
5.       Women and the Georgian Family
6.       Crime and the Poor
7.       War, Empire, and Colonial Goods
8.       Economic Revolutions? Industrialisation and Consumption
9.       Radicalism in the Age of George III

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials102:0020:00Pre-recorded lectures and accompanying review quizzes (twice delivery time as per ERF)
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion301:0030:00Source commentary (summative), 48-hour exam (summative)
Structured Guided LearningAcademic skills activities82:0016:00Pre-recorded workshops on analysing primary sources with accompanying guided activities
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading981:0098:00Recommended and further reading
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Online seminars
Structured Guided LearningStructured research and reading activities91:009:00Set readings for seminars and discussion boards
Structured Guided LearningStructured non-synchronous discussion91:009:00Collaborative group activities on Canvas including discussion boards and Padlet
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery91:009:00Drop-in Q&A sessions
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

The combination of pre-recorded lectures, non-synchronous workshops and collaborative group discussion, synchronous seminars, and drop-in sessions is designed to encourage an active and student-led approach to learning. Pre-recorded lectures and quizzes provide a foundational knowledge of core themes and are active learning experiences that use technology enhanced learning to provide instant feedback on students’ progress. Non-synchronous workshops provide students with the skills to analyse and locate primary sources used by historians to interpret the history of eighteenth-century Britain. Non-synchronous collaborative group activities and synchronous seminars allows for the discussion of relevant historiographical interpretations, encourages independent study, and promotes improvement in oral presentation, interpersonal communication, problem-solving skills, and adaptability. Preparation for online collaboration and workshops requires students to read and critically analyse a wide range of primary sources and secondary literature: a programme of private reading that requires good time management and personal responsibility for learning. The synchronous drop-in sessions provide an informal forum for students to raise questions and discuss the module content. Pre-recorded lectures, non-synchronous workshops and collaborative group discussion, and synchronous seminars support students’ ability to interpret eighteenth-century sources and relevant historiographical debates.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Exams
Description Length Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written Examination1002A6048 hr take home exam (2500 words)
Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M401500 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The essay tests acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject as well as the ability to locate and synthesize relevant information and express complex ideas clearly in written form using appropriate scholarly apparatus. The take home exam tests the ability to think and analyse a problem quickly, while applying general and detailed knowledge of the topic. The exam tests the ability to critically analyse, contextualise, and connect a primary source to the debates and developments of a given historical period. It pushes students to think critically and write concisely, while testing their problem-solving skills and adaptability. Work submitted during the delivery of the module forms a means of determining student progress. All submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes and develops key skills in research, reading, and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree. Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable