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Module

HIS2252 : A History of Aotearoa New Zealand to the 1920s

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Jen Kain
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module covers the history of Aotearoa New Zealand until the 1920s when the British Dominions were declared 'autonomous communities'. It takes a chronological approach to the country’s history to account for its development as a nation-state in P?keh? (white European) terms. Importantly, to counter this Eurocentric view, the module begins with the ‘pre-history’ Polynesian settlement of the region. It then considers colonisation in terms of relations with the M?ori peoples and the land, specifically the Treaty of Waitangi and the New Zealand Land Wars. In moving into the latter part of the nineteenth century, the module situates New Zealand in a globalising world, in which its reforms were heralded as state experiments. Refusing to federalise with the Australian colonies, New Zealand became a Dominion in 1907 and remained loyal to the ‘mother country’ in the First World War and the Empire Settlement schemes that followed.

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the following themes:
•       The place of New Zealand in the Pacific, the British Empire, and alongside Australia.
•       Systematic emigration as de facto colonisation.
•       The development of political self-governance, economic policies and migration control.
•       Liberalism, women’s suffrage and labour reforms.
•       The nineteenth century perception of New Zealand as a ‘Better Britain’ and the contradictions therein.
•       How and why Te reo M?ori (language and culture) exists alongside a British-New Zealand national identity.

Overall, this module will provide an opportunity for students to acquire a sound general knowledge of New Zealand’s history using a wide range of primary and secondary material. It will challenge them look more closely at indigenous/coloniser relations, national identity, and how New Zealand’s history and culture is portrayed today.

Outline Of Syllabus

Outline syllabus, intended as a guide only; week-by-week topics may be slightly different from the following:

      Polynesians as the first settlers
      European exchanges: M?ori and P?keh?
      Settler Colonialism: From the Treaty of Waitangi to self-government
      ‘Britain of the South’: New Zealand in the provincial era
      The New Zealand Wars
      The ‘Vogel Era’: Public works and immigration
      New Zealand as a social laboratory
      Suffrage and Labour Reforms
      Dominion status and the First World War
      Empire settlement and Demographic concerns
      Idealising the ‘land of the long white cloud’, past and present

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion601:0060:00N/A
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials361:0036:00Non-synchronous lectures Quizzes, media clips, te reo Maori (language) (2 x delivery)
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading681:0068:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Synchronous online scheduled seminars (needs timetabling)
Structured Guided LearningStructured non-synchronous discussion92:0018:00Discussion boards, directed primary source research in online repositories
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops22:004:00Practical academic skills workshop in advance of each assignment (needs timetabling)
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery22:004:002 x drop in surgeries in advance of each assignment submission (needs timetabling)
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesModule talk11:001:00Online synchronous intro to the module/getting to know each other session (needs timetabling)
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Recorded 25/30 min lectures will provide the contextual overview to each week's theme. Online seminars provide students with an opportunity to participate in discussion and thus to improve their oral communication, team-working, interpersonal and presentation skills. These forums will enable students to raise and discuss issues in a small group setting, while the guided structured tasks will advance their research skills.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay1M251000 word documentary analysis (includes footnotes, excludes bibliography)
Essay1A753000 word extended essay (includes footnotes, excludes bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The documentary analysis tests the ability to critically analyse, contextualise and connect a primary source to the debates and developments of a given historical period. It will push students to think critically and write concisely. The extended essay tests acquisition of a clear general knowledge of the subject as well as the ability to develop an appropriate topic, gather and synthesize information relevant to that topic, and express complex ideas clearly in written form using appropriate scholarly apparatus. All submitted work will test intended knowledge and skills outcomes and develops key skills in research, reading and writing.

All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree. Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable