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Module

HIS3295 : Royal Portraits: Christian Kings and Kingship, c. 870-c. 930

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Ms Anne Redgate
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

In general
•To provide an opportunity to acquire a sound general knowledge of the subject, reading widely and critically in the primary and secondary literature associated with it.
•To provide an opportunity of investigating in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography.
•To develop the capacity for independent study.
•To investigate in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography.

Module-specific aims
•To undertake study in comparative history.
•To consider the portraits and representations, self-image and ideology of kingship of five Christian monarchs, one each from Anglo-Saxon England, the empire of the Franks, Bulgaria, Byzantium, and Armenia, spanning six decades.
•To establish the similarities and differences between them.
•To investigate the contacts between them.
•To identify the sources behind these images and ideas.
•To appraise artistic and literary source material, and the links between them.

Outline Of Syllabus

The following is a guide.

1.
An Introduction to the module at the beginning of the teaching period.
Identifying overall conclusions at the end of the module.

2.
The five case studies
Charles the Bald, Carolingian emperor of the Franks 875-77
Alfred, king of Wessex 871-899
Symeon, tsar of Bulgaria 893-927
Leo VI ‘the Wise’, emperor of Byzantium 886-912
Gagik Artsruni, king of Armenia 908-943

3.
The major literary sources that offer a representation of each monarch and of his and/or his circle’s ideology of kingship.

4.
The works of art that portray or evoke each monarch.

5.
The political context, problems and opportunities of each monarch.

6. Physical appearance and its meanings - crowns, robes, physical features, ceremonial.

7. the qualities of the 'ideal' ruler - wisdom, learning, building, humility, penitence, justice.

8. International contacts and influences - trade, war, diplomacy, pilgrimage, travel.

The five case studies will first be considered separately and in connection with the topics listed under 3.-5., as a foundation for considering them comparatively and in connection with the topics listed under 6.-8.

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion301:0030:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Seminars, synchronous online
Structured Guided LearningStructured research and reading activities361:0036:00Non-synchronous online structured guided learning
Structured Guided LearningStructured research and reading activities92:0018:00non-synchronous structured guided learning
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery91:009:00N/A
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study981:0098:00N/A
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Seminars encourage independent study and promote improvements in oral presentation, interpersonal
communication, problem-solving skills and adaptability.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Written exercise1M20Documentary commentary, 1,250 words (inc. footnotes but exc. bibliography)
Written exercise1M20Documentary commentary, 1,250words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Essay1A60Word limit 2,000 (including footnotes but excluding bibliography)
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Documentary commentary exercises in submitted work and in examinations test knowledge and understanding of the texts set for the module, the ability to compare and contrast related source texts on a common subject, the ability to expound and criticize a textual extract lucidly, succinctly and with relevance in a relatively brief space, and, in an exam, under pressure of time.

Work submitted during the delivery of the module forms a means of determining student progress.

The form of the resit is no different from the above, i.e. no marks are carried over from the sit to the resit. Students are not allowed to submit for the resit any work that they have previously submitted.

Submitted work tests intended knowledge and skills outcomes, develops key skills in research, reading and writing.
This module can be made available to Erasmus students only with the agreement of the Head of Subject and of the Module Leader. This option must be discussed in person at the beginning of your exchange period. No restrictions apply to study-abroad, exchange and Loyola students.
All Erasmus students at Newcastle University are expected to do the same assessment as students registered for a degree.
Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending semester 1 only are required to finish their assessment while in Newcastle. This will take the form of an alternative assessment, as outlined in the formats below:

Modules assessed by Coursework and Exam:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be one essay in addition to the other coursework assessment (the length of the essay should be adjusted in order to comply with the assessment tariff); to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Exam only:
The normal alternative form of assessment for all semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be two 2,000 word written exercises; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Modules assessed by Coursework only:
All semester 1 non-EU study abroad students will be expected to complete the standard assessment for the module; to be submitted no later than 12pm Friday of week 12. The essays should be set so as to assure coverage of the course content to date.

Study-abroad, non-Erasmus exchange and Loyola students spending the whole academic year or semester 2 are required to complete the standard assessment as set out in the MOF under all circumstances.

Reading Lists

Timetable