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Module

SOC3081 : Anthropology in the City: Inquiry-driven module

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Sarah Winkler-Reid
  • Owning School: Geography, Politics & Sociology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This inquiry-driven module is taught through a series of workshops where students will define, explore, analyse and report on a problem or issue related to Newcastle-Gateshead and its residents. The focus will be on the development of research skills, as well as key graduate skills: critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, curiosity and engagement.
Urban anthropology provides theoretical, empirical and methodological tools for exploring and understanding the city and urban experiences. The ever-growing body of literature examines a range of interconnected topics including; poverty, inequality, dispossession and social (in)justice; the built environment, urban development and capital flows; politics, citizenship, security; households, relationships, lifestyles and selves. As an inquiry-driven module, most content will not be set in advance, but will be derived through students’ emerging focus of inquiry.

Aims:
1) For students to become familiar with a range of social anthropological research on cities and urban experiences.
2) For students to have the opportunity to further develop research skills and graduate skills; critical thinking, collaboration, creativity, curiosity and engagement through inquiry and analysis of specific issues or problems relating to the surrounding city and urban lives.
3) For students to develop critical, theoretically informed approaches to understanding and reporting on these issues or problems.

Outline Of Syllabus

The module will be in three parts:
A.       Foundations: In part A we will establish our foundations in urban anthropology. This part of the module will be the most conventional, there will be readings to read, understand and discuss. We will consider different research methods that are used by urban anthropologists. We will explore some of the key topics within urban anthropology such as;
-Urban places, mobilities and public space
-Urban economies, the built environment, capital flows and urban development
-Lifestyles, consumption and leisure, night life
-Inequalities, social control, protest.

B.       Exploration and question- setting: In part B the focus will be on choosing one of these broad topic areas to explore in more depth. You will undertake a range of in-session and independent research activities as part of this, for example (participant) observation, interviews, map making, photo essays, media or social media analysis, video creation. By the end of part B you will have established a problem or question you wish to answer and gathered a range of primary data to help you answer it.

C.       Evidence analysing and argument producing: In part C you will focus on collating and analysing the data you have collected, connecting it to academic literature from the urban anthropology, developing persuasive arguments and effective communication and modes of presentation. This will be achieved through a range of structured in-session and independent learning activities, including writing activities. By the end of part C you will have produced a report for the module portfolio.

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials92:0018:00Non synchronous, on line
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion130:0030:00N/A
Structured Guided LearningAcademic skills activities92:0018:00Non-Synchronous, non-timetabled remote delivery
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading1116:00116:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Synchronous, timetabled on-line delivery (small group practicals)
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops91:009:00Synchronous, timetabled on-line delivery (Skills based Q&A)
Total200:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

The module will be entirely workshop-led. Workshops will support the inquiry-driven learning method through a range of in-class and out-and-about activities, both group and individual; including discussions, presentations, written activities, research sprints and observation.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Portfolio2M1003500 words. 1. Record of module engagement, 30%, 2. Research paper, 55%, 2300 approx words 3. Reflection on skills, 15% 1200 wds
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Portfolio2MOn-going feedback via discussion boards
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

Assessment enables knowledge and skills developed in the module to be fully assessed.
Assessment is via a Module Portfolio in three parts, overall word count 3500 (+/- 10%):
1.       Record of module engagement, 30%: structured asynchronous activities completed on Canvas will constitute record of engagement in the module. Full details of what constitutes engagements and marks tariff will be provided. This part of the assessment will be evidenced through screen shots of Canvas.
Intended knowledge outcomes: 1 - 3
Intended skill outcomes: 1 – 4

2.       Research paper, 55%, 2300 approx words: students will apply anthropological analysis to a specific problems, issues or phenomena that they have identified and researched throughout the module. Students will draw on literature from urban anthropology, as well as primary research in order to make an argument about the issues being explored.
Intended knowledge outcomes: 1 and 3
Intended skill outcomes: 1 - 3

3.       Reflection on skills, 15%, 1200 approx words: students will demonstrate graduate skills they have developed in the module through structured reflections. Reflections will be structured according to STARR (situation, task, action, result, reflection) and sample reflections will be provided.
Intended knowledge outcomes: 2
Intended skill outcomes: 4

Reading Lists

Timetable