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Module

SPE3053 : Speech and Language Pathology III A: Disorders of fluency; sensory, motor and cognitive impairments

  • Offered for Year: 2021/22
  • Module Leader(s): Mrs Linda Jose
  • Lecturer: Dr Lindsay Pennington
  • Owning School: Education, Communication & Language Sci
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 20.0

Aims

-       To prepare students to work effectively as speech language therapists with clients, their families & other members of the multi-disciplinary team to meet the needs of clients with the conditions:
o       Audiology Deafness/Hearing Impairment
o       Learning Disability and complex needs
o       Autistic Spectrum Disorders
o       Visual impairment
o       Sensory disorders (hypersensitivity; sensory integration; proprioceptive difficulties)
o       Cerebral Palsy
o       Disorders of Fluency (stuttering, cluttering)

-       To provide knowledge of aetiology & presentation of above conditions and their consequences for individual’s speech, language & communication and to consider the changing nature and needs over the lifespan

-       To be able to interpret audiological assessment results, understand limitations & advantages of different assessment techniques & apply this knowledge to consider the functional implications of different types of hearing loss on an individual

-       To apply the WHO ICF framework to the above disorders to gain understanding of how the individual’s impairment, activity and participation in society, environment and personal factors interact to determine an individual’s level of disability

-       To understand methods of assessment, intervention and management of speech, language and communication needs of individuals with the above conditions

-       To understand the role of speech and language therapist within a variety of service delivery models and multi-disciplinary teams in delivering interventions and reducing the disability experienced by individuals with the above conditions

-       To be introduced to the range of Alternative Augmentative Communication (AAC) approaches and tools available, to consider factors to consider when choosing AAC approaches for individual clients & components of communicative competence which need to be developed in an AAC user

-       To consider how issues of multilingualism & cultural diversity should be accommodated in order to work effectively as speech and language therapist with clients with the above named conditions as appropriate with a specific focus on signing and deaf culture

-       To understand service user’s perspectives on their communication, disability, experiences of speech & language therapy and of wider services.


In relation to HCPC Standards of Proficiency (SoP), the primary focus of this module is SoP 13.13: understand developmental impairments of speech, language, communication, with the conditions listed above (swallowing is not addressed within this module) and 14.21: to be able to use knowledge of speech and language therapy to assess and work with people with developmental speech and language impairments. It also relates to 13.1.

This module builds on foundations of case based problem solving and develops students’ ability to be able to analyse and critically evaluate the information collected (14.9), the ability to demonstrate a logical and systematic approach to problem solving (14.10) and the ability to use research, reasoning and problem solving skills to determine appropriate actions (14.11)

Other standards of proficiency are also relevant.
The module aims to develop an holistic approach to focusing on partnerships with clients and carers (9.3; 9.7), understanding the range of social, psychological, situational and medical factors which contribute to service users’ communication status and/or functioning (5.1; 5.2; 14.18) the importance of the sociological context (13.11) and the psycho-social consequences of the service user and their families/carers as a consequence of their communication difficulties (14.19). Learning will consider the need to work with others (9.6). The module promotes the application of science and theory to assessment and intervention (13.6), measurement of effectiveness (13.2) and therapeutic and learning processes and contexts (13.12; 13.7). It develops the ability to analyse and critically evaluate information collected (14.9).

Outline Of Syllabus

Other standards of proficiency continued from AIMS:
Students apply and synthesise knowledge of communication impairment, linguistics, phonetics, psychology and biomedical sciences to the management of clients with speech and language impairments (14.16; 4.1; 4.4).


SYLLABUS
1.       Introduction to the module – content, structure, assessment, models of disability and key themes (ICF framework; multi-disciplinarity; AAC; user-involvement in the module).
2.       Introduction to AAC
a.       The range of AAC approaches and tools available including hand-on experience with a range of devices
b.       factors to consider when choosing AAC approaches for individual clients
c.       the components of communicative competence which need to be developed in an AAC user
3.       Audiology for Speech and Language Therapists
a.       Aetiology and presentation of conditions leading to deafness/HI
b.       interpretation of audiological assessment results
c.       limitations and advantages of different assessment techniques
d.       aids and Implantation
e.       functional implications of different types of hearing loss on an individual
4.       Speech and Language Therapy for clients who are/have
a.       Deaf/hearing impaired
b.       Visual Impairments
c.       Sensory disorders (hypersensitivity, sensory integration, proprioceptive difficulties)
d.       Cerebral Palsy
e.       Fluency disorders
f.       Autistic Spectrum Disorder
g.       Learning Disability

For each condition teaching will cover

-       Aetiology and presentation of the above conditions and associated disorders
-       their consequences for individual’s speech, language and communication and changing nature of the needs over the lifespan
-       the application of the WHO ICF framework to gain an understanding of how the individual’s impairment, activity and participation in society, environment and personal factors interact to determine an individual’s level of disability
-       methods of assessment, intervention and management of the speech, language and communication needs
-       the role of speech and language therapist within multi-disciplinary teams in delivering interventions and reducing individual’s experience of disability
-       how issues of multilingualism and cultural diversity should be accommodated in order to work effectively as speech and language therapist – with particular emphasis on deaf culture and signing
-       To understand service user’s perspectives on their communication, their disability, their experiences of speech and language therapy and of wider services.

User Involvement will include contributions regarding
-       navigating services and getting support as a parent of 2 deaf children
-       AAC user experiences of work, social life and growing up as an AAC user
-       meeting with the families of adults/young people with learning disability and/or complex needs to understand how communication disabilities affect them

In relation to the RCSLT curriculum guidance, the Speech and Language Pathology modules allow the students to demonstrate the applied knowledge of the full range of speech, language and swallowing difficulties and their speech and language therapy management. This module focuses specifically on clinical areas: 7: Fluency disorders 9. Hearing impairment (including deafness) 12. Mental health conditions (children) and 13. Neurodevelopmental conditions and/or learning disabilities. Within psychological and social sciences (4.4.2), there is a focus on applications of psychology to speech and language therapy practice. There is also a focus on speech and language acquisition and change over time, multilingualism (4.4.1) applications of social and cultural factors to speech and language therapy practices: (4.4.2) and psychiatry, paediatrics and audiology within 4.4.3 (biological and medical sciences).
RCSLT guidance continued in Additional Data.

Teaching Methods

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture152:0030:00Lectures from external experts
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion1210:00210:00Preparation of assignment split between semesters
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture34:0012:00Lectures from external experts
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesLecture43:0012:00Lectures from external experts
Guided Independent StudyDirected research and reading352:0070:00N/A
Structured Guided LearningStructured research and reading activities221:0022:00Preparation for workshops and case based problem solving.
Guided Independent StudySkills practice21:002:00Audiology practice online interactive activities
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops24:008:00Audiology workshop interpret assess results. online. AAC session-Discuss Service User & hands on exp
Guided Independent StudyProject work120:0020:00Complex Case Study Data collection
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops12:002:00With service users
Guided Independent StudyStudent-led group activity41:004:00ASD
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesScheduled on-line contact time32:006:00Online Audiology lectures
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesModule talk21:002:001 x introduction to module 1 x complex case report
Total400:00
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Module talks/Lectures include
- 2 module talks by the module leader to orient students to the structure, key themes and assessment approaches and to prepare them for the blended learning aspect of the module.
- 1 lecture briefing students on how to conduct the Case Study in groups which involves visiting and observing a client with learning disability and/or complex needs
- lectures from experts in the specific conditions covered in this module and including 2 involving service users. Some will be face to face and some synchronous and asynchronous online

Lectures have been chosen as a teaching method to make explicit links between theory and concepts and clinical management decision making for the conditions listed above.
Selected sessions involve presentations by/ interviews with/group activities with invited service users on psychosocial and practical issues.

Online lectures and skills practice (blended learning) have been chosen as a method to allow students to learn a highly technical, interpretative and knowledge based component of the module (interpretation and understanding of audiological assessment approaches and results and their relationship to the various pathologies underpinning deafness/hearing impairment). In this way students are able to work at their own pace, revisit technical content, test their own knowledge and have the opportunity to apply their knowledge to example cases.

Workshops are used in two ways. 1) an audiology workshop supports students to apply the knowledge learned in the blended learning component of the module (above) to data interpretation with the support of the specialist lecturer. 2) to provide hands-on experience trying different Alternative and Augmentative Communication technologies.

Guided independent study provides students with the opportunity to

-       Devise appropriate methods of assessment, intervention and management of the speech, language and communication needs for specific individuals with the above developmental conditions,
-       Understand the role of speech and language therapist within a variety of service delivery models and multi-disciplinary teams
-       Apply the WHO ICF framework to the above disorders

Assessment Methods

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Report1A251500 word report detailing a) interpretation of audiological assessment b) potential functions implications of HI.
Case study2A251500 word case management plan - Pragmatic Language Impairment of Autistic Spectrum Disorder.
Case study2A302500 word group study (3-5 students) exploring communicative function client with learning disability/complex needs.
Design/Creative proj2A20Service user leaflet - Fluency
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The report assesses student learning of audiology, deafness and hearing impairment. It has two elements: the interpretation of audiological findings and a ‘case study’ where students are asked to discuss how those audiological results might affect the client’s functional communication. The report format encourages the integration of knowledge gained from lectures and private study, and demands the ability to utilise their knowledge base with respect to the nature and aetiology of Hearing Impairments in children and demonstrate the skill of synthesising and interpreting audiological assessment data and linking that to the functional implications of Hearing Impairments for children.

The case reports assess
- students’ ability to devise an appropriate management plan for a child with pragmatic language impairment or Autistic Spectrum Disorder. The format will draw on skills in data collection, assessment, and intervention and permit students to practise these skills in a hypothetical setting. Knowledge around aetiology, development and appropriate intervention will be drawn on.

- students’ abilities to collect and analyse data to build a holistic profile of a client with complex needs (including physical and/or learning disability and associated conditions). It will draw on knowledge of the impact of intellectual impairments on communication development and on appropriate service provision and intervention.

Design project will cover the Fluency aspects of the module.

Reading Lists

Timetable