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Module

BIO1021 : Diversity of Life: Form and Function

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Mark Shirley
  • Lecturer: Dr Catherine Tétard-Jones, Dr Fiona Cuskin, Professor William Willats, Dr Maria Del Carmen Montero-Calasanz, Dr Maxim Kapralov, Professor Neil Boonham, Professor Frank Sargent, Dr Jon Marles-Wright, Dr James Stach
  • Owning School: Natural and Environmental Sciences
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 10
Semester 2 Credit Value: 10
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

The module aims to provide a broad introduction to the diversity of forms and functions in animals, plants and microorganisms that will stimulate students’ interest in all forms of life. The module will include the basic body plans of major animal phyla and the evolutionary relationships between those phyla, the diversity of plants in relation to different environments and the importance of microorganisms in the natural world as well as for human well-being. The combination of lectures and practical work will engender an understanding of fundamental biological principles and develop cognitive skills through the analysis and interpretation of data and observations obtained within the laboratory.

Outline Of Syllabus

Lectures:
Lectures on animals provide a broad introduction to major animal groups. They explore the evolution of fundamental characteristics such as body cavities, tissue layers, bilateral symmetry and type of cell cleavage during embryogenesis. Beginning with the simplest animals, the module examines the evolution of bilateral symmetry and of more complex characteristics in invertebrates. It then explores the early evolution of the chordates, leading eventually to the vertebrates.
Lectures on microorganisms will examine the diversity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, key features of microbial growth and physiology, interactions with plants and animals and uses of microorganisms.
Lectures on plants will examine relations between plant structures, such as leaves, and their functions, how plants acquire nutrients and the importance of water, how they have adapted to the diverse and in some cases extreme and stressful environments in which they grow, and the likely consequences of climate change.
Practicals will cover:
Morphology of invertebrates and its relation to phylogeny
Comparative anatomy of vertebrates
Structures of microorganisms
Measurement of microbial growth
Nitrate in plant nutrition
Adaptation through Crassulacean acid metabolism

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Timetable