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Module

CME8055 : Energy sources and storage

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Alasdair Charles
  • Lecturer: Dr Stevin Pramana, Professor Adam Harvey, Professor Lidija Siller
  • Owning School: Engineering
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

The module aims to provide students with an understanding of modern energy storage and handling systems from conventional batteries through photo-voltaics to fuel cells and bio-fuels. The topics will be illustrated with industrial and transport applications. Consideration of alternative and sustainable energy sources will be provided as well as discussion of efficiency and cost issues.

Outline Of Syllabus

The development of energy storage technology will be explained starting with primary batteries and then secondary cells. Improvements and design requirements for rail and other transport uses will be discussed (eg. emergency lighting systems). Modern Li-ion, metal hydride (hydrogen storage), solid state and metal-air batteries will be described with links to their practical applications in transport and technological systems. The efficiency of systems and the concept of ‘smart batteries’ will be introduced.

The history of fuel cell development and the fundamental kinetics and chemical thermodynamics behind them are outlined. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and the various types (low, medium and high temperature) of cell will be introduced along with the material selection issues associated with their operation.

Developments in applications (including space travel) would be explained with reference to the change from hydrogen/oxygen cells to alkaline/PEM cells.
The current status and prospects for bio-fuel cells are also outlined.

Bio fuels – solid, liquid and gas sources. Production of bio-alcohols, bio-diesel and syngas. Applications in transport and development of green fuels.

Photo-voltaics to include fundamentals of solar cells, properties and design, single and multiple junction solar panels, semi-conducting materials for solar cells. Design of stand-alone systems, manufacturing routes and environmental impact of system development.


Alternative energy systems, thermoelectric systems, Peltier and Seebeck effects, thermoelectric materials (bismuth telluride, automotive thermoelectric generators and radioisotope power generators), thermoelectric refrigeration and heat pumps. Concepts in renewable energy will be discussed.

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Timetable