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Module

HIS3030 : History and Society

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Christopher Loughlin
  • Lecturer: Dr Shane McCorristine, Dr Sarah Campbell, Dr Vicky Long, Professor Graham Smith, Dr Darakhshan Khan, Professor Susan-Mary Grant
  • Teaching Assistant: Miss Violeta Tsenova
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

Students usually come to university to study History primarily because they enjoy the subject. They are probably more concerned initially with finding out where they have come from, than where they are going to. When, therefore, the question arises of how the knowledge that they have gained on their degree is relevant to or will benefit them in the wider world, their first thought may be that there is not much immediate value in what they have been studying from the point of view of what they will be doing next. They may also consider the development and presentation of historical knowledge to be primarily of interest to specialists, and/or a private hobby for non-specialists.

This module is designed to disabuse students of these ideas. It will do so by introducing them to various practical and societal usages of history and by guiding them through some of the ways in which the knowledge that they have gained might be applied in relation to a range of public issues. It will examine the role played by ideas about history in the formulation of public policy, in questions of regional and national identity, and in popular culture. In this sense the module is designed to help students to think about the wider significance of historical investigation as well as to make the transition to the next phase of their life.

Outline Of Syllabus

The module will be taught through 2 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour seminar most weeks, together with a field trip (several different options will be offered), film screenings, and workshops on presentation skills.

The first 8 or 9 weeks will be where the bulk of the module content (in terms of lectures and seminars) is concentrated. These weeks are likely to be divided into three broad groups, to highlight the different contexts in which history may be used: region, nation, and world. Topics will explore the interrelationship in these contexts between history and various other subjects, which may include:

Politics,
Policy,
Media,
Commemoration,
Public Engagement,
Heritage,
Fiction,
Education,
‘History from below’,
Identity.

The final three or four weeks of the module will concentrate on training, preparation and delivery of the oral and visual assessment.

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Timetable