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Module

HIS3000 : Reading History

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Luc Racaut
  • Lecturer: Professor Tim Kirk
  • Owning School: History, Classics and Archaeology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module represents one of the capstones of the Newcastle history degree programme. Constructed around the study of a single seminal secondary text, it is designed to enable students to explore the themes, evidence, approach, argument, literary merit and methodology of said text within the broader context of the historiography within which it is positioned, the intellectual skills acquired at Stages 1 and 2 of the Newcastle degree programme, and to employ these in a genuinely independent and intellectually robust way as preparation both for the writing of a dissertation (the 'Writing History' module) if appropriate and for the challenges of the world beyond academia.

This module aims:
1.To encourage in students the habit of considering new arguments and evidence, not within the confines of a particular module's subject matter but in the light of all the historical knowledge that they already possess.

2.To enable students to relate particular areas of historical knowledge to:
i.Other areas of knowledge and issues arising from different modules taken during the three years of their Honours Programme
ii.General historical knowledge other than that acquired through taught modules (e.g. by private reading, from television etc)
iii.Ethical, cultural and political issues and debates

3.To provide an opportunity of investigating in some depth selected problems, including the appraisal of selected source material and the critical examination of current historiography.

4.To provide an opportunity for students to read more widely and critically and to do so independently.

Outline Of Syllabus

-: purchase of selected text and reading of same.
-: discussions of topics that will vary from book to book, but which will begin and end with sessions dealing with: what does the book say and do? and summing up. In between the seminars will address some combination of: historiography, methodology, theoretical approach(es), concepts (conceived or developed in the book in question), connections/relevance/usefulness to World History, and opportunities for comparison with other examples from different periods of world regions, or with other historical works. The module is intended to have something of a synoptic character, so at all points students are encouraged to draw comparative or related examples from all the modules they have studied to date, as well as from other sources of information (the media, literature, etc).

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Timetable