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Module

POL3117 : Politics of Immigration

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Dimitris Skleparis
  • Owning School: Geography, Politics & Sociology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

The module aims to identify and explore how immigration is governed, perceived and experienced across the globe. In particular, the module aims to enable students to:
1.       gain an understanding of the key concepts, causes and consequences of immigration, as well as the historical, economic, political, and social factors that have shaped them;
2.       reflect on the institutions, actors and policies involved in governing immigration;
3.       critically evaluate the political dilemmas involved in addressing immigration for a wide variety of actors from political parties, citizens, and media;
4.       critically examine the individual, contextual, and structural factors that influence immigrants’ experiences in host countries.

Outline Of Syllabus

International migration has been one of the signature phenomena in the last few decades, and one of the most debated topics in many developed and developing countries. This module examines immigration from a comparative political perspective by drawing on European, American, and Asian examples. Part I of the module explores key concepts used to make sense of immigration, as well as theories and empirical evaluations of the economic, social, political and cultural causes and consequences of the phenomenon. It also examines the main institutions and actors involved in the governance of immigration, and the ways they govern it. Specifically, we will address the following questions: Who migrates and why? What are the implications of immigration? Who is governing immigration and in what ways? Part II offers theoretical and comparative empirical perspectives on some of the main factors that inform the ways states govern immigration. We specifically focus on how politicians, political parties, governments, native citizens and the media respond to increasing immigration: what is the role of party politics, public opinion and the media in immigration policymaking, and how does each one of these factors influence it? Finally, Part III moves to consider the experiences and voices of immigrants themselves. It critically examines the effects of gender, body, sense of identity and belonging on immigrants’ lives in host countries.
Topics to be covered could include:
• Immigration concepts, motives and implications
• The governance of immigration:
o Institutions and Actors
o Politics of Openness vs. Politics of Closure
• States’ responses to immigration:
o the role of Party Politics
o the role of Public Opinion
o the role of Media
• Critical perspectives on immigration:
o Security and Insecurity
o Citizenship and Identity

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Timetable