Skip to main content

Module

SML2013 : Surveying East Asian Literatures

  • Offered for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Michael Tsang
  • Owning School: Modern Languages
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 1 Credit Value: 10
Semester 2 Credit Value: 10
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This module introduces students to contemporary (post-1980) English-written or English-translated literary works (and, where possible, some of their derivative adaptations such as films) from and on different East Asian societies, such as Hong Kong, mainland China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, etc. The primary texts aim to capture East Asian regions in their ever-changing aspects, from their processes of hypercapitalised globalisation and transmedia exchanges, to traumatic national histories and gender issues.

Outline Of Syllabus

Semester 1
Meeting 1 (Weeks 1-2): Module Introduction
Introduction (online, synchronous); Textual reading workshop (present-in-person)

Meeting 2 (Weeks 3-4): What is Asia? (Theoretical reading)
Lecture (online, non-synchronous); Small group seminar discussion (present-in-person); essay workshop (online syn)

Each of the remaining weeks will feature a two-week unit, in which the first week will be lecture materials, and the second week a present-in-person seminar discussion. The third hour will be an online syn workshop on essay writing

Meeting 3-4 (Weeks 5-8): Japanese literature
Lecture (online non-syn); seminar (discussion, present-in-person); essay workshop (online syn)

Sem 2
Meeting 5-6 (Weeks 10-13): Korean literature
Lecture (online non-syn); seminar (discussion, present-in-person); essay workshop (online syn)

Meeting 7-8 (Weeks 14-17): Chinese literature
Lecture (online non-syn); seminar (discussion, present-in-person); essay workshop (online syn)

Meeting 9: Asian literature
Lecture (online non-syn); seminar (discussion, present-in-person)

Essay surgery
Preparation for summative assessment (online syn)

Teaching Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

Teaching Activities
Category Activity Number Length Student Hours Comment
Guided Independent StudyAssessment preparation and completion130:0030:00N/A
Structured Guided LearningLecture materials94:0036:00N/A
Structured Guided LearningStructured research and reading activities92:0018:00Seminar prep
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesSmall group teaching91:009:00Present-in-Person
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesWorkshops71:007:00Synchronous online: Essay writing workshops
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesDrop-in/surgery11:001:00Synchronous online: Essay surgery
Guided Independent StudyIndependent study198:0098:00N/A
Scheduled Learning And Teaching ActivitiesModule talk11:001:00Synchronous online: Module introduction
Total200:00
Jointly Taught With
Code Title
SML2113Surveying East Asian Literatures - Part 1
Teaching Rationale And Relationship

Each novel from the syllabus will constitute a two-week unit, with the first of the two weeks used for non-synchronous lecture materials where students listen to pre-recorded lectures, and the second of the two weeks used for a face-to-face seminar discussion (where students discuss their ideas regarding the novel under guidance from the lecturer) and a synchronous online essay writing workshop.

The recorded lecture materials provide crucial knowledge to the historical, cultural, social and political backdrop to both the Asian society concerned and the corresponding literary text. Such information not only familiarises the students with the context of the work, but also alerts them to the aesthetic ways the text engages with the relevant themes.

Students are required to have carefully read the primary texts before engaging with the lecture materials and coming to seminars; it is to allow ample reading time that the meetings are spread across the two semesters of an academic year. In addition, they are also expected to have consulted the suggested readings from the module handbook.

A final essay surgery session will allow students to seek advice on coursework requirements.

This module is taught and assessed in English.

Assessment Methods

Please note that module leaders are reviewing the module teaching and assessment methods for Semester 2 modules, in light of the Covid-19 restrictions. There may also be a few further changes to Semester 1 modules. Final information will be available by the end of August 2020 in for Semester 1 modules and the end of October 2020 for Semester 2 modules.

The format of resits will be determined by the Board of Examiners

Other Assessment
Description Semester When Set Percentage Comment
Essay2M1002500 words. A choice of questions will be provided.
Formative Assessments
Description Semester When Set Comment
Written exercise1MCommentary on theoretical readings on Asia due in Teaching Week 9, Semester 1.
Assessment Rationale And Relationship

The module assessment will have three components, two assessed and one formative.

The assessed essay of 2,500 words at the end of the module evaluates students’ development of key transferable skills, including argument planning and organising, independent research and critical analysis, creativity and innovation, word-processing, and referencing and bibliographical work. A choice of questions covering lecture themes will be provided.

The oral presentation and ensuing discussion, which take place at every student-led seminar, aim to test students’ skills in presenting a coherent and supported reading of literary texts in a defined time period, and their leadership ability in taking charge in peer discussion. These are also important transferable skills that students can develop during the module.

There will also be a formative assessment due close to the end of Semester 1, in the form of a 1,000-1,500-word commentary that will ask students to comment critically on the theoretical reading on Asia from Lecture 2. By this point students will already have studied a few Asian literary texts, and therefore the commentary is designed to give them an exercise opportunity to make use of their knowledge on Asia to critically reflect on how Asia is imagined in other scholarly writings. It also allows formative feedback from the lecturer on students’ writing abilities.

Reading Lists

Timetable