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Module

SOC3098 : Community and Conflict in the Countryside (Inactive)

  • Inactive for Year: 2020/21
  • Module Leader(s): Dr Ruth McAreavey
  • Lecturer: Professor Sally Shortall
  • Owning School: Geography, Politics & Sociology
  • Teaching Location: Newcastle City Campus
Semesters
Semester 2 Credit Value: 20
ECTS Credits: 10.0

Aims

This course is about contemporary rural society. It will provide students with an understanding of sociological issues of power, community and conflict that arise in rural areas. The main focus is on Ireland and the UK but the course also considers the countryside in an international perspective. To reflect the breadth of rural studies the course will examine debates about a range of current issues in rural areas that will include agriculture and industrial change, land ownership, community and inheritance. The contested views on what land should be used for (production, consumption, preservation) and the power of the associated lobby groups will also be considered. Students will be expected to critically engage with the way in which agrarian change has underpinned the more fundamental changes that have taken place in rural areas. This is manifest in a range of topics which will be examined by the students and may include industrial change and agrarian politics, sociological theories of agriculture, class and modernisation, landuse management, women in agriculture, migrants in agriculture, community planning and state policy and agriculture.

The module aims are:

•       To explore the meaning of rural society and to introduce students to sociological understandings of rural society
•       To develop students’ critical awareness of different contestations of the countryside
•       To explore the relevance of class, ethnicity, gender, the role of the state, and power struggles within a rural context.

Outline Of Syllabus

We start by introducing students to the concepts of rural and community before examining the significance of industrialisation and agrarian society in rural debates. The course moves on to examine changes in rural society including questions relating to land ownership from historical and contemporary contexts. The rest of the module will build on these foundations to address classic sociological questions of equality, gender, race and power by considering topics such as farm safety; community participation and governance; inheritance and land rights; migrants and precarious labour; and the role of local, national and international bodies. A number of these issues are particularly topical and will include debates on Brexit, refugees and international migration. Students will be encouraged throughout the course to engage in these contemporary debates.

Teaching Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Assessment Methods

Module leaders are revising this content in light of the Covid 19 restrictions.
Revised and approved detail information will be available by 17 August.

Reading Lists

Timetable